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8 Shows We Need to Be Renewed for Next Season

Save these gems from the bubble!

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Megan Vick
Boris Kodjoe (Station 19), Katheryn Winnick (Big Sky), and Josh Dallas (Manifest)

Boris Kodjoe (Station 19), Katheryn Winnick (Big Sky), and Josh Dallas (Manifest)

ABC/NBC

We are heading into the worst time of the year for TV fans who have watched their favorite shows week to week over the course of the traditional TV season (though the 2020-21 TV season can hardly be called traditional due to the COVID-19 pandemic shooting delays). It's nearly Upfronts time, which means that networks are going to be tightening their belts and making tough choices about what shows will carry on to the next season and which ones will be saying goodbye now. Sometimes shows have been warned that they are going into a final season, or have been given enough time to prepare a proper series finale before going off the air, but other times shows get canceled after filming is done and fans are left with whatever was shot before the news dropped. 

It's sad to see any show go because it means that hard-working people have to find new jobs for the upcoming season, but there are some cancellations that are just straight-up painful. (Do y'all remember Pitch? Because it still hurts!) It happens every season, but TV Guide is using its sway in favor of nine shows we'd bereft to not have in our watching rotation next season. These shows make us laugh, cry, and feel all of the things on a weekly basis and we are pleading with networks to ensure that we get to continue seeing them on our TVs for at least one more season. 

Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist 

Jane Levy and John Clarence Stewart, Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist

Jane Levy and John Clarence Stewart, Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist

NBC

Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist combines heart and humor with awe-inspiring musical numbers on a weekly basis. Some may have worried that losing Mitch (Peter Gallagher) in such a heartbreaking fashion at the end of Season 1 would have removed the emotional heft of the show, and it's true that the emotion has shifted in Season 2. However, the show dramedy found interesting new character pairings like Max (Skylar Astin) and Mo (Alex Newell) and gave them more to do, while also tackling hard issues like postpartum depression. Perhaps the strongest recommendation for a Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist Season 3 is the show's impeccable, nuanced, take on systemic racism centered on an Emmy-worthy performance from John Clarence Stewart. It's a show that has something to say and its devoted fanbase is still willing and eager to listen. [Airs Sundays at 9/8c on NBC] 

Prodigal Son 

Tom Payne, Prodigal Son

Tom Payne, Prodigal Son

FOX

This show about the son of one of America's most infamous serial killers and his knack for profiling the most depraved of humanity rose quickly to the top of Fox's charts last year during its freshman run. Led by stars like Tom Payne, Bellamy Young, and Michael Sheen, this twisty show delivered a propulsive first season and cliffhanger that almost guaranteed its success in Season 2. But so far, Season 2 has been anything but successful. It's not all bad though. Watching Dr. Whitly plot his escape from prison while Malcolm Bright tries and fails to keep his own past traumas at bay has created some of the more interesting storylines this season. Still, there's a little bit of "blehness" to this season that I can only attribute to the woes most productions have experienced courtesy of the pandemic. I just think the show deserves one more shot at reclaiming its former glory by way of an additional season. We need the old Bright back, and I think one more season that's (fingers crossed) unencumbered by production delays and reshoots can restore this show to greatness. [Airs Tuesdays at 9/8c on Fox] -Malin Curry

Kenan 

Kenan Thompson, Kenan

Kenan Thompson, Kenan

NBC

This comedy stars SNL veteran Kenan Thompson as a man who lost his wife and is raising his two daughters with the help of his deceased wife's dad, played by Don Johnson. Casting Thompson as a morning talk show host echoes some of Thompson's funnier SNL sketches, and he also has Chris Redd as his onscreen brother/manager Gary, which works to good comic effect. The show addresses grief while still keeping a light touch to get laughs. With 2020 being a rough year of loss for so many of us, Kenan is a gentle and sweet show that helps deal with emotional pain without weighing viewers down. It's a feel-good show that always plays to the cast's strengths and we'd love to see more of it. [Airs Tuesdays at 8:30/7:30c on NBC] -Diane Gordon

Station 19 

Boris Kodjoe and Jaina Lee Ortiz, Station 19

Boris Kodjoe and Jaina Lee Ortiz, Station 19

ABC

The uninitiated still refer to Station 19 as "The Grey's Anatomy firefighter show," and while more frequent Grey's crossovers may have helped the show find its footing over the past two seasons, Station 19 has earned the right to stand on its own as a gripping, emotional, and sometimes hilarious drama. With Grey's Anatomy's fate up in the air as ABC negotiates contracts for a potential Season 18, we're worried that Station 19 might bid adieu if Grey's decides to end as well, and that just straight-up isn't fair. This season alone had a tiger break into the fire station, a cult dance party, and an out-of-control flaming Zamboni. At the same time, Station 19 is making powerful statements about police brutality, addiction, and grief. What was once an underrated spin-off has become a jack-of-all-trades and Station 19 deserves to stick around even if the firefighters aren't constantly dropping off patients at Grey Sloan Memorial. [Airs Thursdays at 8/7c on ABC]

All Rise

Simone Missick, All Rise

Simone Missick, All Rise

CBS

What began as a legal drama from the judge's perspective quickly proved itself to be a smartly written melodrama that went into the personal lives of the people working in the justice system. The show excels at examining the grey areas of the legal system and how difficult it is to administer justice fairly; all very timely issues right now. All Rise also shines because of the diverse cast that's actually believable as work colleagues. With the legal challenges the U.S. is facing now, All Rise is a show that can tackle current issues in real-time and that's enough of a reason to keep it going for another season. [Airs Mondays at 9/8c on CBS] -Diane Gordon 

Big Sky

Katheryn Winnick and Kylie Bunbury, Big Sky

Katheryn Winnick and Kylie Bunbury, Big Sky

ABC

David E. Kelley is up to his old tricks with this new drama adapted from C.J. Box's hit series of books about the disappearance of two sisters and the detectives who join forces to find them. The show's currently in its first season, but it's already gone on hiatus twice. Once just after a major character was beaten with a hammer and left in critical condition and then once more after revealing the state of said character, but despite the breaks, we are still hooked. Simply put, the show is good drama and exactly the kind of soapy stuff we need to briefly escape from the everyday worries of life. I'm eager to see how this season ends but even more excited to see where Cassie (Kylie Bunbury) and Jenny (Katheryn Winnick) could go if they're given a second season. [Airs Tuesday at 10/9c on ABC] -Malin Curry

Manifest

Josh Dallas, Manifest

Josh Dallas, Manifest

NBC

Manifest has had us wrapped around its finger for three seasons now and we feel like we are just scratching the surface of what happened to Flight 828. Season 3 dug deeper into the mythology of what happened to the passengers on that doomed flight -- and what their purpose is among the living -- than ever before and it's only made us that much more invested. Showrunner Jeff Rake has said he still has a couple more seasons planned out to fully uncover the mystery and we would riot if the show was cut off before we got the answers to our burning questions. [Airs Thursdays at 8/7c on NBC]

Good Girls 

Mae Whitman, Christina Hendricks, and Retta, Good Girls

Mae Whitman, Christina Hendricks, and Retta, Good Girls

NBC

We'll be honest and say that Good Girls Season 3 made us question how much longer NBC could drag out the drama of three moms trying to keep their heads above water after inadvertently joining forces with a counterfeit money-manufacturing gang lord, but then Season 4 showed up and put us in our place. The season was twistier and more stressful than ever with the trio not only having to appease Rio (Manny Montana) but also having the Secret Service breathing down their necks. The show zigs when you think it is going to zag and it is once again one of the most entertaining dramas out there. We have no idea how these women are going to get out of their latest scrape, but we're along for the ride and can't wait to see how much more of a mess they can get into. [Airs Sundays at 10/9c on NBC]