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The Best New TV Shows of 2021

The TV year is off to a good start with Spanish horror, addictive soaps, and fantastic superhero shows

Sure, that old show you've been watching for seven seasons has earned your loyalty. But you're starting to notice that it's sagging in the middle, it does more things that annoy you than it did when you first started watching, and there are signs that you're starting to drift apart. Then you look out of the corner of your eye and see a sexy new show tempting you to watch it. It's time to give in to temptation and give yourself to a new show.

Whether it's on Netflix, Hulu, or even on a dinosaur like CBS, as long as it's good and new, you'll find it on the list below. We'll also tell you where to watch it, link up a TV Guide review (if there is one), and show off a trailer so you can get a taste for yourself. Enjoy!

Check back often, as this story will be updated throughout the year.

JUNE


Sweet Tooth

Christian Convery, Sweet Tooth

Christian Convery, Sweet Tooth

Kirsty Griffin/Netflix

Premiered June 4 | Watch on Netflix
Set in the aftermath of a catastrophic global virus, the comic book adaptation Sweet Tooth is a show for our times. The series follows a "very special boy" named Gus (Christian Convery), a human-deer hybrid on a journey across the American West, accompanied by an unexpected group of friends. It's just the right blend of strange, dark, and hopeful, with a resonance no one involved in the show originally could have planned. -Kelly Connolly [REVIEWTRAILER]

MAY


Flatbush Misdemeanors

Kevin Iso and Dan Perlman, Flatbush Misdemeanors

Kevin Iso and Dan Perlman, Flatbush Misdemeanors

Grace Rivera/SHOWTIME

Premiered May 23 | Watch on Showtime
The struggle is real for artist Kevin (Kevin Iso) and teacher Dan (Dan Perlman) in this charming low-profile comedy about two lifelong friends just trying to make it to tomorrow in the rapidly gentrifying neighborhood of Flatbush in Brooklyn, New York. Juggling relationships with getting paychecks and avoiding a local angry drug dealer (Hassan Johnson), Flatbush Misdemeanors plays like a show that exists in the same universe as Broad City and could be cousins with Atlanta. It's old Brooklyn through and through, yet still feels like it speaks for this generation. [TRAILER]

The Underground Railroad

Thuso Mbedu, The Underground Railroad

Thuso Mbedu, The Underground Railroad

Amazon Studios

Premiered May 14 | Watch on Amazon Prime Video
Barry Jenkins made his first big foray into TV with this miniseries based on the Colson Whitehead novel about an alternate reality that imagines the Underground Railroad as an actual railroad with trains, conductors, and engineers. Cora (Thuso Mbedu), an enslaved woman, boards the train in effort to secure her freedom, all while being pursued by a vicious slave owner (Joel Edgerton). William Jackson Harper and Lily Rabe co-star. -Allison Picurro [TRAILER]

Hacks

Jean Smart, Hacks

Jean Smart, Hacks

Jake Giles Netter/HBO Max

Premiered May 13 | Watch on HBO Max
Jean Smart is a living legend, and we owe it to human civilization to do everything we can to protect her, starting with watching everything she's in. Smart stars in what's easily HBO Max's best original comedy so far as Deborah Vance, an aging Las Vegas comedian whose time at the top is nearing its end, so circumstance teams her up with an entitled young comedian (Hannah Einbinder) recently canceled for a joke she made on Twitter. Watch this to cackle at Smart dropping delicious one-liners and chucking iPads into a pool. The cast also includes Kaitlin Olson and co-creator Paul W. Downs.  [TRAILER]

Ziwe

Ziwe Fumudoh, Ziwe

Ziwe Fumudoh, Ziwe

Barbara Nitke/SHOWTIME

Premiered May 9 | Watch on Showtime
Ziwe Fumudoh rose to internet fame in 2020 thanks to her Instagram series, Baited, in which she interviewed people like Alyssa Milano and Rose McGowan and asked them questions such as, "How many Black friends do you have?" Her new show doesn't sacrifice that signature irreverent, provocative style. Part talk show, part variety show, part surrealist fever dream, Ziwe mixes interviews with songs, sketches, and woman-on-the-street segments, as Fumudoh challenges her guests and her audience on cultural issues. -Allison Picurro [TRAILER]

Girls5eva

Paula Pell, Sara Bareilles, Renée Elise Goldsberry, and Busy Philipps, Girls5eva

Paula Pell, Sara Bareilles, Renée Elise Goldsberry, and Busy Philipps, Girls5eva

Heidi Gutman/Peacock

Premiered May 6 | Watch on Peacock
Tina Fey and Robert Carlock -- the minds behind 30 Rock -- collab once again on this Peacock original comedy about a girl group who reunite 20 years after they were almost famous. It's got that trademark Tina Fey zing to its jokes, mashing pop culture references and cutaway gags into its zaniness, as the women -- not nearly as limber as they used to be -- chase success for a second time with frequently disastrous results. Sara BareillesBusy PhillipsReneé Elise Goldsberry, and Paula Pell star, with many SNL vets stopping by for cameos. [TRAILER]

APRIL


Shadow and Bone

Shadow and Bone

Shadow and Bone

Netflix

Premiered April 23 | Watch on Netflix
Based on Leigh Bardugo's dueling Grishaverse novel series, Shadow and Bone and Six of Crows, the big-budget series follows a young woman who discovers she's in possession of a power that can save the kingdom, natch. The tone is somewhere between Game of Thrones and something you'd find on Freeform, with a dark color scheme and violence mixing it up with love triangles. If you liked The Witcher but could do without the occasional silliness of that show, you'll probably like this. Fair warning: the world-building of the first two episodes can get a little tedious, but it gets better after that. [REVIEWTRAILER | MORE SHOWS LIKE SHADOW AND BONE]

Cruel Summer

Harley Quinn Smith, Chiara Aurelia, and Allius Barnes, Cruel Summer

Harley Quinn Smith, Chiara Aurelia, and Allius Barnes, Cruel Summer

Freeform/Bill Matlock

Premiered April 20 | Watch on Freeform, Hulu
This end-of-innocence teen drama in the vein of Pretty Little Liars follows an awkward teen girl's transformation into a cool kid and then into one of the country's most hated people when she's suspected to be partly responsible for the disappearance of her town's most popular girl. It's an addictive, twisty tale told across three timelines -- three consecutive summers in the mid '90s -- that will have parents all over hoping their kids never grow up. And it has a kickass era-appropriate soundtrack, to boot. [REVIEWTRAILER]

Mare of Easttown

Kate Winslet, Mare of Easttown

Kate Winslet, Mare of Easttown

Michele K. Short/HBO

Premiered April 18 | Watch on HBO Max
Kate Winslet! That should be enough to get you to watch HBO's latest high-profile prestige miniseries, which stars Winslet as Mare, a detective who returns to her hometown in blue-collar Pennsylvania to investigate a murder. Returning home means mixing it up with the family again, including her mother (played by Jean Smart), with whom she has many bridges to rebuild from the ashes. The seven-episode miniseries will trickle out weekly. [TRAILER]

Exterminate All the Brutes

Caisa Ankarsparre, Exterminate All the Brutes

Caisa Ankarsparre, Exterminate All the Brutes

Velvet Film/David Koskas/Courtesy HBO

Premiered April 7 | Watch on HBO Max
Sure, anyone can roll a camera, scream "cut," and call themselves a filmmaker, but Raoul Peck is a FILMMAKER. Peck (I Am Not Your Negro) re-edits the history books in this stunning four-episode series that dances between dramatized history and documentary, exploring colonialism, racism, and exploitation in ways that spotlight the truth that America and the world has largely chosen to ignore. It's going to make you uncomfortable, and it should; growth and progress isn't always easy, but it is necessary. [TRAILER]

Kung Fu

Olivia Liang, Kung Fu

Olivia Liang, Kung Fu

Dean Buscher/The CW

Premiered April 7 | Watch on The CW
In The CW's Kung Fu — partially inspired by the early-'70s David Carradine series — Nicky Shen (Olivia Liang) takes the term "quarter-life crisis" to the next level when pressure from her mother to find a suitable husband and settle down pushes her to run away to a Shaolin monastery in China. But when Nicky's mentor is murdered by a mysterious assassin, she is forced to return to her family in San Francisco to put back together the pieces of the life she left behind. The show is the first broadcast hour-long drama with a majority Asian cast, which is extraordinary, but the most intriguing thing about Kung Fu is how the series blends a lot of genres together. -Megan Vick [TRAILER]

This Is a Robbery: The World's Biggest Art Heist

This Is a Robbery: The World's Biggest Art Heist

The blue room of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, This Is a Robbery: The World's Biggest Art Heist

Netflix

Premiered April 7 | Watch on Netflix
In 1990, two men posing as police officers robbed Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum of $500 million in art. Over 30 years later, none of that work has been recovered, and the case remains unsolved. That infamous art theft is the subject of this gripping four-part true crime docuseries, which digs into the mystery of who took those paintings and where they are now. The series also promises some juicy mafia drama, because it's Boston. -Kelly Connolly [REVIEWTRAILER]

Worn Stories

Worn Stories

Worn Stories

Netflix

Premiered April 1 | Watch on Netflix
This heartwarming docuseries is all about clothes, but not necessarily from a fashion sense. Regular people talk about their connection to certain articles of clothing they own, usually ones that have a special significance in their lives. The stories of love, perseverance, and joy will feel as nice and comfy as your favorite pair of jeans. [TRAILER]

MARCH


Invincible

Invincible

Invincible

Amazon Studios

Premiered March 26 | Watch on Amazon Prime Video
Robert Kirkman's follow-up to The Walking Dead is this animated series based on another one of his comic books, the superhero coming-of-age story Invincible. The top-notch voice cast that includes Steven Yeun, J.K. Simmons, and Sandra Oh makes it easy to recommend, but it's the unique superhero origin story of a young man (Yeun) whose dad is the world's most famous superhero and the violent action that makes it great. [REVIEW | TRAILER]

John Wayne Gacy: The Devil in Disguise

John Wayne Gacy: Devil in Disguise

John Wayne Gacy: Devil in Disguise

Marty Zielinski/Peacock

Premiered March 25 | Watch on Peacock
Peacock's first foray into true crime is a good one, a comprehensive look at one of America's most famous serial killers that, thanks to a rarely seen interview he did from prison before he was executed, shows a side of the man that most people aren't familiar with. It might be a tad too long, but the revealing portrait of the man is worth it. [TRAILER]

The Falcon and the Winter Soldier

Sebastian Stan and Anthony Mackie, The Falcon and the Winter Soldier

Sebastian Stan and Anthony Mackie, The Falcon and the Winter Soldier

Disney+/Marvel

Premiered March 19 | Watch on Disney+
Let's get this out of the way real quick: It's not as good as WandaVision. But Disney+'s second Marvel TV series has the action you expect from the Marvel Cinematic Universe, following Sam Wilson/Falcon (Anthony Mackie) and Bucky Barnes/Winter Soldier (Sebastian Stan) as they do what they do, which is casually insult each other while beating up bad guys. It's Lethal Weapon with more lethal weapons. [TRAILER]

Waffles + Mochi

Michelle Obama, Waffles + Mochi

Michelle Obama, Waffles + Mochi

Adam Rose/Netflix

Premiered March 16 | Watch on Netflix
Every parent who needs help convincing their kid to eat something other than a plain plate of noodles with a little bit of butter or other non-nutritious food should serve this adorable series to their picky eaters immediately. The series, part of the Obamas production deal with Netflix, stars Michelle Obama and a could cute puppets in a mixed-media show that educates children on food and cooking from all over the world. [TRAILER]

Bloodlands

James Nesbitt, Bloodlands

James Nesbitt, Bloodlands

Acorn TV

Premiered March 15 | Watch on Acorn TV
You do not mess with James Nesbitt. The intense Irish actor stars in the British police drama as a detective who digs into a cold case that opens up wounds from the violence in Northern Ireland decades earlier. Naturally, while pursuing a killer, the case connects personally to Nesbitt's character, who believes the culprit may be an assassin who murdered his wife years before. It's executive produced by Jed Mercurio (Line of Duty, Bodyguard), so expect the unexpected. [TRAILER]

Last Chance U: Basketball

Last Chance U Basketball

Last Chance U Basketball

Netflix

Premiered March 10 | Watch on Netflix
Netflix's Emmy-winning docuseries goes all Charlie Ward on us by becoming a two-sport star. After a handful of seasons following football, the series goes to the hardcourt and doesn't miss a step with heartwarming and heart-wrenching stories of underprivileged kids working hard to overcome personal and systemic obstacles. In fact, it may be better than ever as it follows the East Los Angeles College Huskies on their quest for the California junior college championship, with their fiery coach and players desperate to move on to D1 programs providing motivational stories that even non-sports fans will enjoy. [TRAILER]

Murder Among the Mormons

Murder Among the Mormons

Murder Among the Mormons

Netflix

Premiered March 3 | Watch on Netflix
Your next true crime obsession is this three-part series detailing murders that shook the Mormon community in Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1985. Following a pair of pipe bombs that killed two people, a third victim was found with a trunk full of rare documents that include the notorious White Salamander Letter, which had the potential to destroy the very foundation of Mormonism. [REVIEW | TRAILER]

FEBRUARY


Ginny & Georgia

Antonia Gentry and Brianne Howey, Ginny & Georgia

Antonia Gentry and Brianne Howey, Ginny & Georgia

Netflix

Premiered Feb. 24 | Watch on Netflix
"We're like the Gilmore girls but with bigger boobs," Georgia (Brianne Howey) says in the first episode of this high-energy series, and that about sums it up. The mother-daughter dramedy follows Georgia as she hauls her 15-year-old daughter Ginny (Antonia Gentry) and 9-year-old son Austin from Texas to a small town in Massachusetts for two reasons: to start over after Georgia's husband suddenly dies, and to run away from a closet full of skeletons. It's part teen drama as Ginny explores a new high school and part mystery thriller as Georgia's dangerous secrets come to chase her down. [REVIEW | TRAILER | SHOWS LIKE GINNY & GEORGIA]



Superman & Lois

Elizabeth Tulloch and Tyler Hoechlin, Superman & Lois

Elizabeth Tulloch and Tyler Hoechlin, Superman & Lois

The CW

Premiered Feb. 23 | Watch on The CW
Superman & Lois is the first new superhero show to premiere on The CW since Arrow ended, and it begins an important new chapter for the network. Helmed by former Flash showrunner Todd Helbing, Superman & Lois doesn't look anything like any of the Arrowverse shows, despite its titular characters being introduced on Supergirl years ago. It's a more grounded take on the Man of Steel (Tyler Hoechlin), as he and Lois (Elizabeth Tulloch) move with their teenage twin boys to Smallville to give their family a chance to be closer. While there's still plenty of superhero action to keep Superman busy, the new series is just as much a family drama as it is an action show, and that's to its benefit. There's plenty of Krypton lore to keep Superman fans satiated, but this is also a great chance for non-superhero fans to jump in and get invested in the Kent family dynamics, which are the real heart of this ambitious drama. -Megan Vick [REVIEW | TRAILER]



Beartown

Oliver Dufåker, Beartown

Oliver Dufåker, Beartown

Niklas Maupoix/HBO Nordic

Premiered Feb. 22 | Watch on HBO/HBO Max
Fredrik Backman's best-selling 2016 novel about the pressures faced by a small-town Swedish hockey team gets adapted into a five-episode series as HBO continues to go back to the beautifully gloomy atmosphere of Scandinavian noir. A former NHL player returns to his hometown to coach the youth hockey team and build around its bright star, but things quickly go south when scandal hits the community. Seeing as it is Scandi-noir, of course it opens up with two figures chasing each other through the snow and a gunshot. Things move fast in the five episodes -- maybe even too fast, as characters' actions aren't always given the time to breathe -- but underneath the hockey and crime is a damning story about the pressures parents put on their children. [TRAILER]



It's a Sin

Olly Alexander and Lydia West, It's a Sin

Olly Alexander and Lydia West, It's a Sin

Ben Blackall/HBO Max

Premiered Feb. 18 | Watch on HBO/HBO Max
Russell T Davies follows up his dystopian future family drama Years and Years (available on HBO Max; I loved it) by going in the opposite direction on the timeline in this visit to early-'80s London. In the five-episode miniseries, a group of young gay friends find strength in each other at the advent of a movement, not knowing they're about to be thrust into the HIV and AIDS epidemic. In true Davies fashion, It's a Sin -- a smash hit in its native England -- is alternately funny, powerful, and incredibly devastating. You will be reduced to a blubbering mess. [TRAILER]



Clarice

Rebecca Breeds, Clarice

Rebecca Breeds, Clarice

Brooke Palmer/CBS

Premiered Feb. 11 | Watch on CBS/Paramount+
A lot of Hannibal fans seem pretty disappointed that Clarice is not actually Hannibal Season 4 in a trench coat, but listen: Hannibal ended perfectly. It's Clarice Starling's turn in the spotlight. This new CBS procedural, set a year after the events of The Silence of the Lambs, legally can't mention Hannibal Lecter at all due to some confusing rights issues with Thomas Harris' books, which leaves the show with no choice but to put its focus where it should be anyway: on one of the coolest heroines of all time. Australian actress Rebecca Breeds makes it look easy to take over a role made famous by Jodie Foster, slipping into Clarice's West Virginia accent as she gets to work chasing new creeps while unpacking her own trauma. The show doesn't match the horror of the film, but it isn't trying to; it's just a sharp, well-executed procedural about a very cool woman. Pairs great with a nice Chianti. -Kelly Connolly [REVIEWTRAILER]



Firefly Lane

Katherine Heigl and Sarah Chalke, Firefly Lane

Katherine Heigl and Sarah Chalke, Firefly Lane

Netflix

Premiered Feb. 3 | Watch on Netflix
I am going to be very upfront about this: I watched the whole first season in an embarrassing binge. I couldn't stop myself. Is it good? No. But between the multiple timelines, soapy storylines, peculiar fashion choices, and aging makeup, I couldn't get enough. Sarah Chalke and Katherine Heigl star as lifelong friends who go through myriad professional and romantic entanglements, (almost) always by each other's sides to lend love and support. It's gal pal time that's as addictive for its questionable choices as it is its delicious drama. [REVIEWTRAILER | SHOWS LIKE FIREFLY LANE]



JANUARY


Resident Alien

Alan Tudyk, Resident Alien

Alan Tudyk, Resident Alien

James Dittinger/Syfy

Premiered Jan. 27 | Watch on Syfy
The comic book series Resident Alien comes to the screen as an incredibly fun combination of the alien invasion miniseries V and misanthropic medical drama House, but with a lot more laughs. Sci-fi mainstay Alan Tudyk plays an alien who crash lands on Earth and disguises himself as a small-town doctor in snowy Patience, Colorado, taking on medical oddities and solving murders, all while executing his grand plan of learning about human behavior and plotting how to destroy them all. Tudyk is wonderful in the role, as is scene-stealer Corey Reynolds as the no-nonsense sheriff who sniffs something suspicious is going on. This is classic light-hearted sci-fi. [TRAILER]



Losing Alice

Lihi Kornowski, Losing Alice

Lihi Kornowski, Losing Alice

Apple TV+

Premiered Jan. 22 | Watch on Apple TV+
This Israeli psychological drama is lathered up in erotically charged mystery that takes cues from the greats of the film world. Writer-director Sigal Avin leans on Alfred Hitchcock, David Lynch, and more for influences in her story about an aging female director (Ayelet Zurer) who becomes obsessed with a young, seductive screenwriter (Lihi Kornowski) and the film that might save her career but destroy her marriage. It's wonderfully shot and loaded with beautiful people, if that's your thing. [TRAILER]



Miss Scarlet and the Duke

Kate Phillips, Miss Scarlet and the Duke

Kate Phillips, Miss Scarlet and the Duke

Courtesy of Masterpiece

Premiered Jan. 17 | Watch on PBS
Peaky BlindersKate Phillips provides the necessary fire behind London's first female private investigator in PBS's Miss Scarlet and the Duke, the latest Masterpiece series to wash up on American shores. Following the death of her P.I. father, a penniless Eliza Scarlet (Phillips) opts to continue her father's services rather than go the traditional route of marrying for financial security, and as you can imagine, her headstrong move has Londoners dropping their monocles into their tea. Her new line of work also sees her frequently cross paths with a fellow inspector nicknamed The Duke (Stuart Martin), and, yep, you got it, their clashes bubble with romantic tension. Will she solve the case of... looooooove? [TRAILER]



WandaVision

Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany, WandaVision

Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany, WandaVision

Disney+

Premiered Jan. 15 | Watch on Disney+
Better late than never, WandaVision is the first television show from the MCU, and represents the future of Disney+, which is kind of a big deal. For fans of Marvel, it's a must-see, soft-launching Phase 4 of the MCU and affecting the events of the upcoming movie Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness. As for the show itself, it adds comedic dimension to stars Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany while a slowly unfolding mystery keeps things captivating. [REVIEW | TRAILER]



Trickster

Joel Oulette, Trickster

Joel Oulette, Trickster

Lindsay Sarazin

Premiered Jan. 12 | Watch on CWTV.com
The supernatural coming-of-age story takes the tried-and-true formula that so many YA shows use, but filters it through the eyes of Indigenous people, following a teen from a broken family who slings drugs part-time working the drive-thru window of a fast-food joint. But things start to get more complicated when the young man begins to experience strange things, like seeing his doppleganger at parties and encountering talking crows. On the surface it seems like something that would fit right at home on The CW, but it has the vibe of a supernatural indie film from an up-and-coming first-time director — there's some clumsiness, but that's far outweighed by the positives — as it explores Indigenous folklore via a teen show. Disclaimer: The series was renewed for a second season but was later canceled when creator Michelle Latimer, who had previously maintained that she had Indigenous ancestry, was found to not be of Indigenous descent. [TRAILER]



All Creatures Great and Small

Rachel Shenton and Nicholas Ralph, All Creatures Great and Small

Rachel Shenton and Nicholas Ralph, All Creatures Great and Small

Courtesy of Playground Television (UK) Ltd.

Premiered January 10 | Watch on PBS
The popular novels written by James Harriot/"Alf" Wright get a loving adaptation that stays true to the source material while also forging its own path. The six-episode first season follows Harriot as he joins a veterinary practice in 1930s Yorkshire, England, fixing animals with warmth and sensitivity... and doctor stuff. It's a comfort-show for those in need of positivity. [TRAILER]



Tiger

Tiger

Tiger

HBO

Premiered Jan. 10 | Watch on HBO Max
The story of Tiger Woods has always been ripe for documentation, but there's never been a better time for it than now. HBO's two-part, three-hour look at Woods' phenomenal rise, incredible fall, uncertain future, and recent comeback is more than just about an athlete, it's about the machine that makes heroes and sets up traps for them to fall into. It's all here: a Black man crashing a white-dominated sport, a company (Nike) building a brand around race, a father pushing his child too far, and the inevitable scandal of extra-marital affairs and substance abuse. Featuring never-before-seen footage of Woods and interviews with those closest to him (but none with Tiger himself), Tiger -- more general public-friendly and unbiased than ESPN's sporty and fawning The Last Dance -- will be loved by golfers and appreciated by anyone fascinated with the life of a groundbreaking icon. [TRAILER]



Lupin

Omar Sy, Lupin

Omar Sy, Lupin

Emmanuel Guimier/Netflix

Premiered Jan. 8 | Watch on Netflix
 Omar Sy stars as Assans Diop, a man who is essentially a French Bruce Wayne if Batman was more of a cat burglar than dark knight. Inspired by the classic French character Arsène Lupin, known as the "gentleman burglar," Diop starts the series off trying to steal a valuable necklace from the Louvre with a grand heist as part of a revenge plot against the wealthy family responsible for the death of father several years prior. Sy is a charming dude, and the heists and trickery are fun, complicated acts, performed under the guise of being the good guy. It isn't the greatest show Netflix ever put out, but it is a very entertaining distraction that's easy to get through. Five episodes air in this run, with more to come later. [TRAILER]



History of Swear Words

Nicolas Cage, History of Swear Words

Nicolas Cage, History of Swear Words

Adam Rose/Netflix

Premiered Jan. 5 | Watch on Netflix
Nicolas Cage hosting a docuseries about the roots of the most famous swear words? Well gosh golly dagnabbit gee willikers, pardon my French, but this sounds flippin' wonderful! Seriously, listening to Cage unleash the F-word through reciting famous movie lines or just running the F-bomb gamut with different inflections to demonstrate its myriad meanings is great. In each 20-minute episode that's focused around one swear word, Cage is joined by comedian talking heads discussing what they love about each curse, as well as lexicon experts who break down the etymology of the words we don't say around our mothers. [TRAILER]



30 Coins

Megan Montaner and Miguel Ángel Silvestre, 30 Coins

Megan Montaner and Miguel Ángel Silvestre, 30 Coins

Manolo Pavon/HBO Nordic

Premiered Jan. 4 | Watch on HBO Max
This Spanish horror series starts off with a bank robber somehow surviving a wave of bullets to snatch a mysterious coin and continues with a small Spanish town witnessing a baby being born out of a cow. Then things get weird. The town's mayor (Sense8's Miguel Angel Silvestre) and local vet (Megan Montenar) team up to figure out what the heck is going on, and whether a local priest (Eduard Fernández), who spends his free time delivering haymakers on a punching bag and hiding guns, has anything to do with the unusual activity. It's freaky, gory horror centered on biblical roots that cribs from the classics like The Omen and The Exorcist with just a touch of camp to keep things a wee bit fun. [TRAILER]